Sunday, March 27, 2011

A New Year at Whitewater Draw, SE Arizona, USA

homemade "picassocam" pinhole camera, paper negative, 1 minute exposure, negative inverted and post-processed in Photoshop, including the colorizing, and adding a texture from Kim Klassen's texture collections. (Thanks, Kim!  I used WarmSun)

Whitewater Draw WIldlife area (near Elfrida, Arizona) is currently maintained by the Arizona Game and Fish Department, and is a stopping place along the migrating "road" of sandhill cranes, from December through about March. The surrounding agricultural area provides food for the cranes and many species of ducks and other birds who pass through, and others that stay all year round.

On this particular day at Whitewater Draw, we stood in awe at literally thousands of sandhill cranes coming in from the fields to roost for the afternoon. I will never forget the sights and sounds of the experience!

Speaking of sound, here is a recording I made of the day's crane fly-in.....


Image made: January 2, 2011


kimklassencafe

Friday, March 25, 2011

Hearth in the Middle of Nowhere, Bledsoe Loop. Ramsey Canyon, Arizona USA

paint can pinhole camera, paper negative, 28-second exposure, developed in Caffenol CM

This fireplace is the only remains of an old cabin along Bledsoe Loop, in Ramsey Canyon, Huachuca Mountains, southeastern Arizona. A pioneer physician named Nelson C. Bledsoe had owned this land in the canyon, which was handed over to the Nature Conservancy at the time of his death in the 1970s. Though this cabin exists on the current-day Bledsoe loop, I do not know if it was Bledsoe's cabin or not.

However, the lonely hearth stands among a cathedral of trees, between the steep walls of this beautiful canyon.

image made March 12, 2011

Thursday, March 24, 2011

More pink abstract spring....

It's a day later, and the tulips have opened a little further...





I usually like film, paper, and pinhole cameras for extending the photographic process, allowing more direct participation in the creation of my images, and for slowing down the entire creation process.   But then there are times when I appreciate the "instantness" of digital, and I can explore nature's beauties with lenses that allow me to see and explore it in ways that my (tired, old) eyes alone  can't do under normal conditions.  I've pretended that I'm in the flowers here, exploring.  It's free-flowing, easy, and spontaneous.   I don't even focus the lens (I can't- as I am holding the lens up to the camera body, in a  backwards orientation.)  I just lean in and out, experimenting with what compositions come into view, as the very selective focus closes in on one part or another.

Perhaps I will revisit the tulips today, with my 10-20mm wide angle lens- backwards.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Renewal In Reverse

I have relinquished winter in my psyche now, and am into photographing the Spring things around me.  (before the "brutal" heat -as a young friend describes it- descends upon us in about 6 weeks!)

So I had fun this morning sitting with a bouquet of tulips, and my stock lens (18-55 mm) held in reverse up to my camera body.  There I was, in my happy place of pink and white, blur and selective focus, and lots of macro.  Lovely abstract Spring!  Oh happy, happy, happy!








and here is one image with the lens threaded on the body in in the standard way....



 Happy Spring!

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Season of the Bloom, pinhole style

paint can pinhole camera, paper negative, 21 minute exposure, developed in homemade Caffenol CM developer.

It was the paint can cam's turn at the magnolia tree the other day. I got out there at sunrise, before the wind picked up. I metered the shot at 17 minutes, but let it go for 21 minutes to allow for reciprocity failure in the low light/long exposure. The camera was placed about 1 inch from the flower. Can you see the tripod there in the foreground, supporting the paint cam as it made the image? (-:

This was a timely image. Some time later that morning, a landscape crew came through and chopped off all the new growth from the main branches, including this lonely little cluster of blooms that flowered out this year. There are other buds higher up in the tree, but they may dry out before they open.

So I was especially happy to preserve this year's bloom before it was gone!


image made March 15, 2011

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Massai Point- Chiracahua National Monument

homemade "picassocam pinhole camera, paper negative, 30-second exposure, post-processed in Photoshop, including colorization

We hiked along the trail leading downwards into the monument-just for a short distance on this hot, September afternoon. I found a big boulder to put picaassocam on for this exposure. Boulders and hoodoos tower overhead while on the trail. They seem so precariously-perched and yet stable at the same time.

I added color in Photoshop in hopes to increase the visibility of the rock formations across the canyon.

image made: September, 2010

Saturday, March 12, 2011

Season of the Bloom, 2011

Despite hard times, the neighborhood magnolia tree is managing a very modest bloom this year.  ((patting the sweet tree))

Here are some blooms thus far:







Images made with 75-300mm lens on Canon t2i DSLR.  Texture in the first three has a texture made by Kim Klassen.  Thanks, Kim!!

"Seasons of the Bloom" is a yearly project of the winter bloom of a magnolia tree that lives around the corner from me.  It's original owner/planter/tender has since passed on, but the tree continues to bring hope of Spring to our neighborhood every year.  The tree, through absence of owners, has suffered neglect over the past three years.  My family and I, along with some neighbors, have done what we can to keep the tree alive.  Therefore, this year's bloom has been especially joyous.

Happy Spring!!!

Friday, March 11, 2011

"Steve", brought to you by a paint can, coffee, washing soda, vitamin C and sea salt. (-:

homemade paint can pinhole camera, 34-second exposure, paper negative, developed in homemade Caffenol CM. Negative was scanned and post-processed in Photoshop, including addition of a texture.

While making blurry Steve images with the Holga, I also made a few with the can cams. It was terribly windy, and I think the very light-weighted paint can cam did it's very best to stay still, yet you can still see the jiggy effects of the wind.

Texture added in PS, and was freely offered by Kim Klassen's Cafe. (thanks a bunch, Kim!) The texture hides the jiggyness a bit, making this image a little more calming to the eye, I think.

Steve is a 150-year-old Fremont cottonwood tree t the San Pedro House, along the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona, between Bisbee and Sierra Vista. He is one of my favorite tree-friends.

Thursday, March 10, 2011

Surreal Steve III- horizontal panning blur

Holga pinhole camera, 5-second exposure, while panning the camera vertically. Kodak 100 TMX black and white film, developed in Caffenol CM. Negative was put on a lightbox and photographed with a DSLR, post-processing in Photoshop. (incl. colorization)

While we photographed together last week, D Stewart PDX introduced me to the technique of panning the camera to achieve motion blur during exposure.


I really want to do more of this work, and I took the kids out to see Steve the other morning, to try it again. This is a horizontal panning (camera on tripod) over the 5-second exposure.

This roll of film had been in the Holga cam for a long time, and I forgot what the ISO was. I used an average of ISO 200 to meter. The images came out very thin on the negative, and I'm not sure if it was because of underexposure in camera, or not enough time in the caffenol developer. (8 minutes) But Steve does look nice in dreamy fog. I added just a bit of color for some added depth and contrast...after all, Steve's leaf buds are coming out, and he looks a bit more Springlike now.

Steve is a 150-year-old Fremont cottonwood tree t the San Pedro House, along the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona, between Bisbee and Sierra Vista. He is one of my favorite tree-friends.

image made: March 7, 2011

Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Surreal Steve II- vertical panning blur

Holga pinhole camera, 5-second exposure, while panning the camera vertically. Kodak 100 TMX black and white film, developed in Caffenol CM. Negative was put on a lightbox and photographed with a DSLR, post-processing in Photoshop. (incl. colorization)

While we photographed together last week, D Stewart PDX introduced me to the technique of panning the camera to achieve motion blur during exposure.

I really want to do more of this work, and I took the kids out to see Steve the other morning, to try it again. This is a vertical panning (camera on tripod) over the 5-second exposure.

This roll of film had been in the Holga cam for a long time, and I forgot what the ISO was. I used an average of ISO 200 to meter. The images came out very thin on the negative, and I'm not sure if it was because of underexposure in camera, or not enough time in the caffenol developer. (8 minutes) But Steve does look nice in dreamy fog. I added just a bit of color for some added depth and contrast...after all, Steve's leaf buds are coming out, and he looks a bit more Springlike now.

Steve is a 150-year-old Fremont cottonwood tree t the San Pedro House, along the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona, between Bisbee and Sierra Vista. He is one of my favorite tree-friends.

image made: March 7, 2011

Monday, March 7, 2011

The jury is out....Courtroom, Tombstone Courthouse, Tombstone, Arizona USA



homemade "picassocam" pinhole camera, 25-minute exposure, paper negative, processed in homemade Caffenol CM developer


Texture added in PS, and was freely offered by Kim Klassen's Cafe. (thanks a bunch, Kim!)

This image could have used more exposure time...maybe 5 minutes more? Maybe even more than that. Reciprocity in low light with paper is hard to guess. I like the foggy atmosphere, though.

Anyway, picassocam dutifully stayed there at the jury box, making this image, while D and I ran around the courthouse photographing other things.

One thing this image didn't capture were the shiny metal spittoons on the floor next to the chairs. (-:

The courtroom was used from the 1880s through the 1920s, before the Cochise County seat was moved to Bisbee, about 20 miles away.

D Stewart PDX came down to my area to photograph, and we had a girls' day out! We pinholed all over Cochise County, Arizona, in the driving snow (flurries) and icy cold wind! We even traded cameras for the day, so I got to shoot a roll of film in her Terminator 3 pinhole camera! Between us, I think we used 5 pinhole cameras this day.

Thanks D, for a wonderful adventure with you!

This image concludes my series of photographic adventures with D.

Image made February 27, 2011.

Sunday, March 6, 2011

D Stewart PDX, the "mystery photographer", pinholing the streets of Bisbee, Arizona, USA

D Stewart PDX's famous "Terminator 3" pinhole camera, Fuji ACROS ISO 100 film, 3 second exposure, Film was developed in homemade "caffenol" developer. Negative was photographed over a lightbox with a DSLR, post-processing in Photoshop.

Here she is! D is busy composing a shot with her zero image pinhole camera. I can't tell if her head is just down, or if it's movement kept it from being recorded! I assure you though, D's head is alive and well, even if this portrait seemed to exclude it! It's a mystery!!!

While we were photographing on the sidewalk here, we attracted some attention that we pinholers can get sometimes. Some passers-by were quite knowledgeable of pinhole cameras, and knew exactly what we were doing, how the cameras worked, and had tried pinhole themselves at some point. Another man, sitting in the cafe window across the street, made a point to come over to chat with us awhile, too.

D Stewart PDX came down to my area to photograph, and we had a girls' day out! We pinholed all over Cochise County, Arizona, in the driving snow (flurries) and icy cold wind! We even traded cameras for the day, so I got to shoot a roll of film in her Terminator 3 pinhole camera! (I'll let D tell you which of my cameras she ran around with)


Thanks D, for a wonderful adventure with you! I sure learned much from you, and I love the Terminator!!!!

Image made February 27, 2011.

Saturday, March 5, 2011

Someone's Dearly Departed-Tombstone Cemetery, Tombstone, Arizona USA (w/vignette and texture)

D Stewart PDX's famous "Terminator 3" pinhole camera, Fuji ACROS ISO 100 film, 1 second exposure, Film was developed in homemade "caffenol" developer. Negative was photographed over a lightbox with a DSLR, post-processing in Photoshop.

This is another version of this image, with a texture added from Kim Klassen's Cafe. (thanks a bunch, Kim!)

It seems like this grave was originally marked with the wooden cross behind the stone, and the stone was placed later. That's my guess, anyway. The stone is leaning forward, and I am afraid it might topple one day. The inscription is barely readable, but if my memory serves, this gentleman died in the 1860s.

Before leaving Tombstone, D and I drove out to the "common folk" cemetery (as opposed to the famous, touristy "Boot Hill" Cemetery) to have a look around. The flurries had stopped, and the wind had died down a bit. The graves mark the places of residents that passed away from about the 1870s through the present day. We found the grave of Nino Cochise (the grandson of Cochise) who lived to be 110 years old!

As D observed, many of the gravesites were handmade- either the stonework, boundaries and other adornments, or all of the above. They were folks making do with the materials they had at the time. There are some elaborate markers, and others that are marked with a simple wooden cross. Some are holding up well over time, and others are crumbling and decaying with age. Some are tended to regularly, complete with trinkets, candles, and silk flowers, while others sit, seemingly forgotten among the invading weeds and cacti..

D Stewart PDX came down to my area to photograph, and we had a girls' day out! We pinholed all over Cochise County, Arizona, in the driving snow (flurries) and icy cold wind! We even traded cameras for the day, so I got to shoot a roll of film in her Terminator 3 pinhole camera! (I'll let D tell you which of my cameras she ran around with)


Thanks D, for a wonderful adventure with you! I sure learned much from you, and I love the Terminator!!!!

Image made February 27, 2011.

Past residents of Tombstone- Tombstone Cemetery, Tombstone, Arizona USA

D Stewart PDX's famous "Terminator 3" pinhole camera, Fuji ACROS ISO 100 film, 1 second exposure, Film was developed in homemade "caffenol" developer. Negative was photographed over a lightbox with a DSLR, post-processing in Photoshop.

Before leaving Tombstone, D and I drove out to the "common folk" cemetery (as opposed to the famous, touristy "Boot Hill" Cemetery) to have a look around. The flurries had stopped, and the wind had died down a bit. The graves mark the places of residents that passed away from about the 1870s through the present day. We found the grave of Nino Cochise (the grandson of Cochise) who lived to be 110 years old!

As D observed, many of the gravesites were handmade- either the stonework, boundaries and other adornments, or all of the above. They were folks making do with the materials they had at the time. There are some elaborate markers, and others that are marked with a simple wooden cross. Some are holding up well over time, and others are crumbling and decaying with age. Some are tended to regularly, complete with trinkets, candles, and silk flowers, while others sit, seemingly forgotten among the invading weeds and cacti..

D Stewart PDX came down to my area to photograph, and we had a girls' day out! We pinholed all over Cochise County, Arizona, in the driving snow (flurries) and icy cold wind! We even traded cameras for the day, so I got to shoot a roll of film in her Terminator 3 pinhole camera! (I'll let D tell you which of my cameras she ran around with)


Thanks D, for a wonderful adventure with you! I sure learned much from you, and I love the Terminator!!!!

Image made February 27, 2011.

Friday, March 4, 2011

An invitation to a hanging- Historic Tombstone Courthouse, Tombstone, Arizona, USA

D Stewart PDX's famous "Terminator 3" pinhole camera, Fuji ACROS ISO 100 film, double exposure, 1 second each of the gallows, and a prison yard wall/door. Film was developed in homemade "caffenol" developer. Negative was photographed over a lightbox with a DSLR, post-processing in Photoshop.

Out to the gallows we went, as storm clouds hurried along in the sky. The wind was biting, and blowing hard. D and I remarked that the great angles for an image were roped off. (which didn't daunt our cameras (on tripod legs) from stepping inside the rope a little bit- without us- to make the shots. (-:

This image is a double exposure- the first being a shot of a prison wall and it's door to the outside world. The second image was of the gallows. I just love the long, wide angle, and tunneling effect of T3!

This is a replica gallows- nobody was actually hung from this structure. The real gallows was burned (deliberately) after the county seat was moved to Bisbee, and the courthouse was no longer used in a public/government capacity.

The courthouse was used from the 1880s through the 1920s, before the Cochise County seat was moved to Bisbee, about 20 miles away.

D Stewart PDX came down to my area to photograph, and we had a girls' day out! We pinholed all over Cochise County, Arizona, in the driving snow (flurries) and icy cold wind! We even traded cameras for the day, so I got to shoot a roll of film in her Terminator 3 pinhole camera! (I'll let D tell you which of my cameras she ran around with)


Thanks D, for a wonderful adventure with you! I sure learned much from you, and I love the Terminator!!!!

Image made February 27, 2011.

Thursday, March 3, 2011

Does thy fate lie at the gallows outside? Tombstone Courthouse, Tombstone, Arizona, USA



D Stewart PDX's famous "Terminator 3" pinhole camera, Fuji ACROS ISO 100 film, 10-second exposure Negative was photographed over a lightbox with a DSLR, post-processing in Photoshop.

While D went exploring and photographing all over the courthouse, I stayed up in the courtroom, getting acquainted with her Terminator 3 pinhole camera.

This was a tough shot! Two tripod legs rested on the window sill, and the other rested on top of my camera bag on the floor. (tripod leg not being long enough to reach the floor) The dark slide of the film back came out on the window frame side, not allowing much room for my hands to move the slide out of the way for exposure. I jostled the camera severely (or so it seemed) as I fumbled through the shot. But, the Terminator saw me through!

The courtroom windows of the Tombstone Courthouse overlooks the prison yard, including the gallows. You can see them here, at the lower left side of the window. Can you imagine being on trial in this court in the 1880s, and seeing the ropes hang silently ot the window, pondering your fate?

The courtroom was used from the 1880s through the 1920s, before the Cochise County seat was moved to Bisbee, about 20 miles away.


D Stewart PDX came down to my area to photograph, and we had a girls' day out! We pinholed all over Cochise County, Arizona, in the driving snow (flurries) and icy cold wind! We even traded cameras for the day, so I got to shoot a roll of film in her Terminator 3 pinhole camera! (I'll let D tell you which of my cameras she ran around with)


Thanks D, for a wonderful adventure with you! I sure learned much from you, and I love the Terminator!!!!

Image made February 27, 2011.

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Order in the court! Historic Tombstone Courthouse, Tombstone, Arizona, USA



D Stewart PDX's famous "Terminator 3" pinhole camera, Fuji ACROS ISO 100 film, 3-minute exposure Negative was photographed over a lightbox with a DSLR.

D Stewart PDX came down to my area to photograph, and we had a girls' day out! We pinholed all over Cochise County, Arizona, in the driving snow (flurries) and icy cold wind! We even traded cameras for the day, so I got to shoot a roll of film in her Terminator 3 pinhole camera! (I'll let D tell you which of my cameras she ran around with)

This is the courtroom at the historic Tombstone Courthouse in Tombstone, Arizona. D had told me how wide the Terminator "sees", and boy howdy, I see what she means! The two tables to the right and left in the foreground were actually adjacent to the tripod. I was thinking the image would begin at the last row of seats, not right next to the camera! Also, the room appears much longer that it really is- as if the front of the courtroom were tunneling further away from the viewer. Perhaps this is how a suspect of some crime felt, when brought into the courtroom for his trial.

The courtroom was used from the 1880s through the 1920s, before the Cochise County seat was moved to Bisbee, about 20 miles away.

Thanks D, for a wonderful adventure with you! I sure learned much from you, and I love the Terminator!!!!

Image made February 27, 2011.