Friday, December 30, 2011

Fave Lights from the Season

How I love the season of light at the darkest time of year!  I like to think of all the holiday lights as a symbol of the light within...contemplating, reflecting,  creating new ideas for the new year, and and a glowing sense of all is as it should be..

Here are my favorite photos of lights from our 2011 season.......

my family, overlooking the city lights under the holiday star up in the foothills

Our community has a very large holiday star, lit with very large bulbs, in the foothills of our closest mountain range.  It's lit from the beginning of December through the first part of January.  It can be seen from just about everywhere in our community.

We took a drive up to the star in early December- bouncing along carefully in 4WD in the dark, till we came upon the star....


There was a beautiful ring around the moon that night, ahead of a winter storm that gave us much-needed rain.

and now a light of a different kind...sunlight!

an "unofficial" copy of a 6-month photo of sun trails from a pinhole camera in my back yard
 I participated in a remarkable photography project this year, called Time in a Can, in which 40 photographers around the world placed pinhole cameras in their own locale, aimed skywards towards the sun's path.  The project's photographing period was from June 21st through December 22, 2011- from solstice to solstice.  

I have just harvested the pinhole cameras, and have shipped the negatives back to Spain, where the folks of Estudio Redondo (which is sponsoring Time In A Can) will scan them, invert them in to photographs, and have a gallery exhibit.

The photo above is an "unofficial" image made from one of my solargraphs from the project.  I didn't scan the negative, rather I took a picture of it with my digital camera, in the darkness of my bathroom-darkroom, with the red safelight on.  I'm sure the quality of the officially scanned image will be much better!  (but I'm pleased with this result- not bad for  mostly- white negative, photographed in red light and darkness besides!)

Anyway, the camera was positioned on the ground, looking up at the sky.  To the left is our back yard fence.  Overhead are the streaks of the sun going across the sky, one streak for every day of the six-month period.  The left-sided streaks were made in the summertime (the southern part of the sky)  Each day, the sun tracked a little more northwards, creating the streak-tracks more and more to the right side of the photo.  The rightmost streaks were made in December.

You can tell the kind of weather we had in different parts of the streaking pattern- clouds occlude the sun's light, and make darker streaks when they were present in the sky.  

Solargraphy is so amazing!!!

And now, a celebration of light of a different kind.....


Although my family is not Jewish, we do light the menorah during Hanukkah.  We do not adhere to any particular religious faith, but feel that learning about different faiths is important to the understanding others, as well as learning from their insights.  Participating (at some level) in the traditions of others gives us a window into their experiences, while enriching our own experiences of this season of light. 

 
We also participate in many Christmas festivities, as well as Bodhi Day earlier in December.

the last candle to go out on our menorah on the 8th day of Hanukkah
Hanukkah is a beautiful tradition to us- and if we don't have a personal connection with the miracle of the oil burning for 8 days, we think of other miraculous events in our lives, and appreciate what we have.

The only other light I am looking forward to photographing is our sparklers on New Year's Eve...but that will have to wait till tomorrow!

Happy New Year, Everyone!  Keep the light of hope and contentment and creativity and inspiration burning within!!


Friday, December 23, 2011

A special camera harvest- Time In A Can!

Happy Winter Solstice- though my greeting is a day late!

Today is the day that the Time In A Can solargraphy project has come to an end. I am one of the 40 lucky participants around the world, who planted 5 pinhole cameras out in the elements on June 21st- the summer solstice.  All 200 cameras around the world have been recording the sun's path, as well as imaging the surroundings, for the last 6 months,, onto photographic paper inside the pinhole can-camera.

Tin Man poses with his can-camera cousins

Here is the bounty of my can-cam harvest- all 5 pinhole cameras, intact after months of baking heat, rain storms, wind, freezing temperatures, and flood.

Now it is time to open the cans under a safelight, and package the negatives to be shipped back to Spain, where there will be a gallery exhibit of the solargraph photos.  Stay tuned for solargraph results!

In the meantime, here are some other solargraph photos I have made in the past.

And also in the meantime, a video from the Time In A Can project- packaging up the cameras to send out to the photographers...enjoy!




6-month solargraphy in my back yard- 2009

Thursday, November 24, 2011

a 2012 calender project

Happy Thanksgiving to Everyone who is celebrating today!

I have a moment between turkey and sides prep to blog. Here's a peek at my newest artsy project.I feel a bookish energy coming over me....

I have decided to make 2012 calendars this year for some special friends- using my pinhole photography, and my fledgling bookbinding skills. It will be a softcover mini-calender to carry in a purse or pack. Here are the front and back covers:


and the back cover:


I have been figuring out, and making, the layout in Photoshop. I have it set up so that four pages (front and back) fit on the front and back sides of a sheet of 8.5x11 -inch paper, so I can print the calender at home.  To make sense of the mindboggling task of knowing which pages go on any one sheet of paper, I made a little mock-up book with regular copy paper first:


and labeled the pages front and back....

So all I had to do is separate this mock book to see the proper layout. 




The layout truly seems haphazard!  Photos of one month are paired up with calendars of other months.  It comes out right in the end, though....

I am indebted to several individuals who have helped me to make this project a lot easier!  These folks offer up items of their talents for free, and here is my shout out to them:

Photography Blography has some great free Photoshop calender template options to download- thank you so much, Photography Blography!

Kim Klassen makes spectacular textures and backgrounds- and  offers a free texture every week to subscribers.  I used one of her textures for the cover pages.  I am grateful to you, Kim!

I downloaded some free fancy, scallop-doo-dad clip art to add some nice decorative touches from about dot com's clip art site.  Thank you, Folks!

When I have completed the print/binding phase of this project, I would like to offer my little calendar in pdf form for free download to anyone who wants one, for their desktops/portable devices.  It's just a little artsy gift from me....continuing the sharing, giving and gratitude to you friends, and those who helped make the project so much nicer!

In order to do that, I need to complete a dvd workshop on making pdf multimedia projects, which is taught by Brooks Jensen of Lenswork. I'm looking forward to making this my first pdf!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Sunday, August 21, 2011

getting in deep...


The more I dive in, the more rust I find!  So I take off one layer at a time, and clean as I go...




Here is the aperture...3 convenient settings!  ( f.16, f.8, and f.4, I think)



Here is the shutter assembly- coated is rust, and very stuck.  I think a few days of soaking in penetrating oil might help...


I have been taking pictures as I go, so I can retrace my steps to assembling the camera again! 

Stay tuned...

Saturday, August 20, 2011

Reviving an old rusty camera!


A friend gave me this rusty, wet, grimy little beauty last night- a vintage Kodak Duaflex camera!

This camera was made from 1947-1959 in The States.  It has a focusable lens, 3 aperture settings, and takes 620 film.  

I opened the camera in total darkness to see if there was any film inside, but their wasn't.....(wouldn't it be cool to find a roll in there?)


Boy howdy, that's rusty!  The shutter is stuck, and the film advance knob is, too...


This is the viewfinder- full of rust, too.  I'll have to take the whole camera apart to clean it out.


I cleaned up the accessible surfaces with my homemade cleaner, and am soaking the screws and nooks and crannies in oil, in hopes to ease everything loose for a complete cleaning, and then see if it will still work!

Friday, August 12, 2011

(Not!) hanging on the fence at Historic Brown Canyon Ranch, Hereford, Arizona, USA

homemade "Picassocam" pinhole camera, 15-sec exposure, paper negative, developed in caffenol CM, color and texture added in Photoshop

Brown Canyon Ranch was recently made more accessible, thanks to a new road. I hope to get out there more often...

The families who occupied Brown Canyon Ranch over the years ranched cattle for nearby Ft Huachuca, providing food for the soldiers.

Good luck will rub off on you if you spy something lucky in this image...

image made: July 31, 2011

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Brown Canyon Ranch Hereford, Arizona, USA


Brown Canyon Ranch Hereford, Arizona, USA by Crunchy Footsteps
homemade paint can pinhole camera, paper negative, 25-sec exposure, developed in Caffenol CM, color and texture added in Photoshop

It's lovely to see green this time of year! I am uncertain if the green here was the comeback of preventative backburning frm the Monument Fire, or just simply from moisture of monsoon rains alone.

The families who occupied Brown Canyon Ranch over the years ranched cattle for nearby Ft Huachuca, providing food for the soldiers.

I exposed a little longer than the meter told me to, to try to get more detail from the shadows in the structures. I'm not sure how much I achieved that, but I am happy with the exposure overall.

image made: July 30, 2011

Friday, August 5, 2011

out building- Historic Brown Canyon Ranch, Huachuca Mountains, Arizona USA

paint can pinhole camera, paper negative, developed in Caffenol CM, color and texture added in photoshop

Daughter and I had a very nice and quiet outing to Brown Canyon Ranch last weekend. This is an outbuilding immediately off the house, which was built in 1905-07.

The families who occupied this homestead over the years ranched cattle for nearby Ft Huachuca, providing food for the soldiers.

The ranch house is currently undergoing renovation, hence the modern-day ladder perched against the building.

Saturday, July 30, 2011

Monument Fire Recovery- and a new-to-me wildflower

Canon EOS t2i DSLR with Sigma 10-20mm lens

Many of the Monument fire burned areas are starting to get green as our summer monsoon season drops much-needed rain. (-:

Here is an example of one area . While driving in the Coronado National Monument, we noticed these beautiful, crawling flowers in the burn recovery area. They are a type of morning glory native to southern Arizona and northern and central Mexico. They are called a pink throated morning glory, or ipomea longifolia.

The US Dept of Agriculture classifies my new favorite wildflower as a "prohibitive noxious weed". Haramuph.

The flower opens up in the evenings.   It was very thunderbumpy while we were there.



images made July 30, 2011

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

video- (1962) "Canon Reflex Zoom 8-3" 8mm movie camera on loan to me



A friend loaned me his Canon Reflex Zoom 8-3 8mm movie camera for a few days, and this video is a product from my learning about the camera.

Come see an informative and entertaining tour of the camera, and then a ttv ("through the viewfinder" ) filming experience with authentic camera sight and sound!

I'm researching about hand-processing 8mm film. I wonder if homemade caffenol (more links on caffenol here and here.) would work on 8mm movie film??? Stunning results can be achieved with caffenol, but even if my results didn't resemble "stunning"   I'd be happy with the low-fi, lomo look.

video made: July 19-20, 2011

Saturday, July 16, 2011

Brown Canyon range land, Huachuca Mountains, Arizona USA

homemade paint can pinhole camera, paper negative, developed in homemade Caffenol CM developer, color and Kim Klassen's "warmsun" texture added in Photoshop

This is a colorized version of this picture.

I colorized it today, in place of a nice hike in our reopened Ramsey Canyon.
We made it to Ramsey Canyon, but 15 minutes into our walk, a young bear ran by! So we decided our hike was over for the day. Colorizing this image of Brown Canyon (just down the road from Ramsey) became the substitute for the hike, but boy, was it fun, too!

image made July 9, 2011

Sunday, June 26, 2011

Charlie's tractor

homemade paint can pinhole camera, paper negative, 25 sec exp, developed in Caffenol CM.

He loves old tractors, and he recently bought one, just because, I reckon. It sounds like a helicopter as he drives it by.

I got this quick pinhole before heading inside for the morning workout. It was literally a dart to get the can in the back of the car, a few seconds to scoop gravel under the can to position it, and 15 seconds to guess-expose, before running the camera back to the car, and going inside. It was purely gut intuition at a fast pace, which isn't natural for me usually, but it worked this time. (-:

image made: June 18, 2011

Time In A Can Solargraphy Project- beginning the 6-month exposures



Time In A Can is a group solargraphy project that is making 6-month exposures from Summer Solstice to Winter Solstice, 2011. It is being coordinated by Estudio Redondo in Madrid.  The studio mailed out 5 premade, preloaded (with paper negatives) pinhole cameras to 40 photographers around the world.  We will be making 6-month exposures with the pinhole cameras from our locales.   Then, we will then ship the cameras back to their place of origin in Spain. These photographs will then be in a future gallery exhibition at Estudio Redondo.

This video documents the beginning of my 5 exposures on June 21, 2011.

You can check the progress of the project through the Time In A Can project page on Flickr:
flickr.com/​groups/​timeinacan/​

Visit Estudio Redondo at their web page:  estudioredondo.com/ .

Also please visit my pinhole photographer friend, Diego López Calvín, who is part of developing this project, and invited me to participate.  He does amazing photographic work!

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Monument Fire on June 14th from Palominas, Az

If you pray, dance or wish, please do so for rain, for the many areas battling wildfires right now.

This is the Monument Fire in Palominas/Hereford/South Sierra Vista, Az. I took this photo at the red cross shelter at Palominas School in Palominas, Az, on Tuesday, June 14th.

It has gotten much worse, as extremely dry conditions, high winds and hot temperatures are fanning it with incredible speed and unpredictability. It is moving into highly populated areas today.

My family and I are safe, and in a good location to remain safe.

Thanks Friends, I just felt a need to share.

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Vintage Cameraness + Huachuca Jazz Project- (36th Army Band) summer concert in the park Sierra Vista, Arizona

Brownie Holiday camera, Efke 127 ISO 100, developed in Caffenol CM, negative photographed over a light table and inverted, sepia tone, texture added in Photoshop

The 36th Army Band's ensemble, the Huachuca Jazz Project, took our brand new bandshell/stage for our first concert in the park this year. I had to go up there and snap a picture of the group with the Brownie Holiday....

I think I might look for a hack on the shutter, so that I can vary the length of exposures. (perhaps the limitation is why they came out with the Holiday Flash model, two years after beginning production of this camera!)

Then again, perhaps I will stick with the historic, original experience of the camera, and get whatever atmosphere come what may in any lighting condition. Still thinking on this one!

I love the dimensions of this film! It sure is a bear to load on the developing spool, though! The 127 film is wound up so tightly, that it wants to curl with a passion. It is so curly, that the leading edge of the film easily pops off the developer spool grooves, derailing the rest of the film while loading. However, folding the leading edge into a flattened shape helps to keep the film on the spool.
image made: June 2, 2011

Sunday, June 5, 2011

Wheel Of Progress (part 1) Sierra Vista, Arizona

Brownie Holiday camera, Efke 127 ISO 100, developed in Caffenol CM, negative photographed over a light table and inverted in Photoshop

Husband took this shot, putting me on the other side of the camera for a change. (-:

After developing and processing, I see that I have "bunny ears" above my head. Which "rotten" kid did that? I instantly assumed it was the 15-year-old, but wait- both his arms are visible. Wait a minute- that's the 10-year-old's little fingers!

The Holiday's shutter speed must be on the slower side- with ISO 100 film, the bright sunny shots are a bit overexposed. (I'm pretty sure it's the in-camera exposure) The midsummer sun is brutal and glary this time of year though, and it was about noon at the time.

This is a tribute to Arizona miners of all eras- the "Wheel Of Progress"- a mining flywheel which turned some sort of compressor or generator at some time in mining history. It turns today (and has for years) slowly, as a tribute, on Highway 92, next to the self-storage.

By the way- the group of agaves to the left are a form of yucca which is very common here in the high dessert of southern Arizona. They bloom in June every year.

image made June 3, 2011

Saturday, June 4, 2011

On Top Of The World at Sunset

Brownie Holiday camera, Efke 127 ISO 100, developed in Caffenol CM, negative photographed over a light table and inverted, sepia tone, texture added in Photoshop

She and the other young ones were dancing, racing, and chasing each other as the 36th Army Band played on. The stage lighting fixture, with it's pointed "roof", was too much to resist. She had to climb to the top! (all two feet off the ground)

It was the opening summer concert in the park for this year, where my family enjoyed watching these kids as much as listening to the music.

This is from my first roll through my Brownie Holiday camera (circa 1955-57) There is no bulb setting on this camera, so there is one fixed shutter speed to work with. Perhaps I can find 127 film in different ISOs to compensate?

I love the dimensions of this film! It sure is a bear to load on the developing spool, though! The 127 film is wound up so tightly, that it wants to curl with a passion. It is so curly, that the leading edge of the film easily pops off the developer spool grooves, derailing the rest of the film while loading. However, folding the leading edge into a flattened shape helps to keep the film on the spool.
image made: June 2, 2011

It's a Brownie Holiday!

Meet the newest member of my vintage cam family! Presenting...a Brownie Holiday Camera, purchased on a whim from eBay. (it's my birthday soon, after all.) (-:

I couldn't help it... It is so compact and cute . It takes cute, compact 127 film, which you can still buy. (I got mine via the internet at Freestyle)

As near as I can figure, the date of manufacture for this camera is probably 1955 to 1957, according to it's features described on the Brownie Camera Page.

I just developed my first roll, images to come...

Thank you American Girl Molly Doll, for letting me borrow your lei and hat for this holiday-making shot of the Holiday!

Wednesday, June 1, 2011

"Steve" in his habitat..San Pedro Riparian Conservation Area, southeastern Arizona

Diana multi-pinhole camera (using one pinhole for this image), 6-second exposure, Ilford Delta ISO 100, developed in homemade Caffenol C, negative backlit on a lightbox and photographed with DSLR camera, inverted in Photoshop

Here's a "head to toe" portrait of "Steve", a 150+-year-old cottonwood tree along the San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona.

I am surprised at the wide angle of this Diana pinhole camera! I was about 50 feet away from the trunk, and actually fit all of Steve in the frame. I guess the focal length is longer in the Diana than it is in my comparatively similar Holga pinhole camera.

Another trend that I have noticed is a softer focus. I think it may be the aperture, but perhaps it could be camera motion. It was a windy day- and you can see Steve's mighty branches moving in the wind here.

The Fam gave me a Diana multi-pinhole camera and a very creative 120 film bouquet for Mother's Day this year. It was a complete whim on their part, and complete surprise to me. What fun it's been!

So where do we go to try it out that afternoon? Well, to go see Steve, of course! ("Steve" is the gentle giant cottonwood tree)

image made: May 8, 2011, San Pedro Riparian area, between Sierra Vista and Bisbee, Az.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

"There's a cow on the roof!!"

Diana multi-pinhole camera (using one pinhole for this image), 6-second exposure, Ilford Delta ISO 100, developed in homemade Caffenol C, negative backlit on a lightbox and photographed with DSLR camera, inverted in Photoshop

This composition is our rendition of this image. (which we found laminated under a tabletop in a Tombstone, Arizona restaurant)

The little log house sits under Majestic "Steve", a 200-year-old cottonwood tree at the San Pedro House, between Sierra Vista and Bisbee, Arizona. I have tried to find out what the house was used for, to no avail yet.


"Where's the cow?" you might be wondering.  Click the image, which will take you to my FLickr account, and then hover your mouse over the image there, to reveal the cow...

The Fam gave me a Diana multi-pinhole camera and a very creative 120 film bouquet for Mother's Day this year. It was a complete whim on their part, and complete surprise to me. What fun it's been!

So where do we go to try it out that afternoon? Well, to go see Steve, of course! ("Steve" is the gentle giant cottonwood tree)

image made: May 8, 2011, San Pedro Riparian area, between Sierra Vista and Bisbee, Az.

Monday, May 30, 2011

American Gothic Self-Portrait (minus the pitch fork)

Diana multi-pinhole camera (using one pinhole for this image), 8-second exposure, Ilford Delta ISO 100, developed in homemade Caffenol C, negative backlit on a lightbox and photographed with DSLR camera, inverted in Photoshop

A self-portrait, while sitting on the steps of the San Pedro House- a historic ranch house-turned gift shop and headquarters for the San Pedro River Riparian Conservation Area. (just a few steps from Steve, the giant cottonwood tree)

The Fam gave me a Diana multi-pinhole camera and a very creative 120 film bouquet for Mother's Day this year. It was a complete whim on their part, and complete surprise to me. What fun it's been!

So where do we go to try it out that afternoon? Well, to go see Steve, of course! ("Steve" is the gentle giant cottonwood tree)

image made: May 8, 2011, San Pedro Riparian area, between Sierra Vista and Bisbee, Az.

Steve and The Boys

Diana multi-pinhole camera (using one pinhole for this image), 6-second exposure, Ilford Delta ISO 100, developed in homemade Caffenol C, negative backlit on a lightbox and photographed with DSLR camera, inverted in Photoshop

Here are the other two reasons I am honored on Mother's Day. (-: (Husband there on the left, Son on the right) The Fam gave me a Diana multi-pinhole camera and a very creative 120 film bouquet for Mother's Day this year. It was a complete whim on their part, and complete surprise to me. What fun it's been!

So where do we go to try it out that afternoon? Well, to go see Steve, of course! ("Steve" is the gentle giant cottonwood tree)

image made: May 8, 2011, San Pedro Riparian area, between Sierra Vista and Bisbee, Az.

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Little Girl with a BIG Stick!

Diana multi-pinhole camera (using one pinhole for this image), 6-second exposure, Ilford Delta ISO 100, developed in homemade Caffenol C, negative backlit on a lightbox and photographed with DSLR camera, inverted in Photoshop

She is one reason I am honored on Mother's Day. (-: The Fam gave me a Diana multi-pinhole camera and a very creative 120 film bouquet for Mother's Day this year. It was a complete whim on their part, and complete surprise to me. What fun it's been!

So where do we go to try it out that afternoon? Well, to go see Steve, of course! ("Steve" is the gentle giant cottonwood tree)

image made: May 8, 2011, San Pedro Riparian area, between Sierra Vista and Bisbee, Az.

Thursday, May 12, 2011

homemade book, part 9: making the covers


2 flat covers, with a flexible flat spine on top, sandwich the pages of this book.  Then the 2 spines are laced together to bind it all together.  Here are the cutout pieces for the front cover.  The black material is illustration board- a thick, but slim book board.  The little rectangles of illustration board are both spines needed for this project.  The thin cardboard with the cutouts, (along with the same-sized piece of illustration board) sandwiches two illustrations into the front cover.


I am using a dry, thin, double-sided adhesive for this project, called ATG tape, and am applying it with an ATG gun.  ("ATG" stands for "adhesive transfer gun")  I've used this adhesive in making a few mini photo folios, and it sticks really well!  It isn't as messy as wet adhesives.  Another plus of using a dry adhesive is you don't have to worry about water-saturated papers and fabric buckling in the finished product.  Acid-free ATG tape is available, and is what I am using here.


This is the back cover pictured here- with the cloth spine, paper cover, and book board materials all lined up, and ready for gluing.


This is the back cover again, in process of gluing and folding the coverings over the book board and spine.



Here is the inside of the back cover, with a cover paper glued over the folded edges.


Here is a setup for the front cover: the cloth and paper coverings in place for gluing to the thin cardboard "frame" over the front cover illustrations.  Suze Orman's encouraging smile there kept me going....  (-:


The finished front cover.....





Finished book covers, ready for their pages!

Next:  Print off the book pages, trim and score them, stack them between the covers, drill the holes for the binding, and then finally, lace the whole thing together....

(I am excited!)

Sunday, May 8, 2011

"Law Day" 2011 -Cochise County Superior Court House, Bisbee, Arizona, USA

paint can pinhole camera, paper negative, 10-second exposure, colorized in Photoshop

Sitting on the steps of the Cochise County Court House, the group of we students, parents, teachers, and officials listened to local youth present their essays, all written on the theme of, "John Adams, From Boston to Guantanamo". It was part of our local presentation of Law Day, 2011. This is a US national educational program sponsored by the American Bar Association, which raises awareness of how the US law system works.

I can tell that the summer sunlight intensity is here where I live already, based on my meter readings and thus, very short exposure times. Of course, the gray-white concrete of the building and steps, in full sunlight, made for a very intense lighting experience anyway!

image made: May 3, 2011

Monday, May 2, 2011

Handmade book, part 8, aka:"Learning weaves texture into one's life"


I've been hanging on the cusp of assembling the homemade book, waiting for an open space of time, and a clear head.  But, I did learn how to sew the tortoise shell binding this past weekend!  It was a mental challenge for me, and I have developed a vast appreciation for the folks who figured it out long, long ago.

I dedicate this week's Texture Tuesday image to the bookbinders and bookmakers everywhere, by integrating my learning process into this week's challenge.  What is the challenge this week, you might ask?  It is to use a coffee/tea mug into your image, and include at least one of  Kim's (free to download) textures.  Husband brought this mug home from a training class years ago, and I love it's message.  (-:  I used two of Kim's textures- "silence" and "WarmSun".  Thank you, Kim!


kimklassencafe

Oh yes...what's in the cup? Darjeeling with agave syrup and cream. (-:

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

The Rich Texture of Monastic Life

It's Texture Tuesday once again!  This time, the challenge is to use Kim Klassen's "serendipity" texture in one layer of the photograph.  
We are also on the heels of Worldwide Pinhole Day, and this is one image I made on that day, which happened to be Easter.  My family had a quiet contemplative time walking the grounds of Holy Trinity Monastery in St. David Arizona.  


kimklassencafe